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Penn State Health and Penn State College of Medicine Visual Identity Standards and Writing Style Guide

The writing style guide is based on Penn State University Style and the Associated Press Stylebook.

Why a style guide?

The overall reputation of Penn State Health and Penn State College of Medicine as a leader in the core missions of education, research, community health and patient care reaches audiences ranging from local to worldwide.

Our reputation can be influenced by how we present ourselves to the public. As much as how we handle relationships with colleagues, peer institutions, the news media, our students and patients, our logo (or brand mark) and overall visual identity make a statement about us. They are an outward expression of our organizational personality, values and goals.

Clarity and consistency convey our commitment to trust, quality and the core values that serve to enhance public perception of Penn State Health and Penn State College of Medicine.

The consistent application of our visual identity guidelines benefits Penn State Health and Penn State College of Medicine in many ways. Increased recognition of our brand identity and its association with all our missions and each of our enterprises means increased understanding and appreciation of our values among and within the many communities we serve.

These guidelines are designed to help you apply our organizational identity to the materials used to communicate to many audiences. Use them to help Penn State Health and Penn State College of Medicine project a consistent image of trust and quality.

Penn State Health and Penn State College of Medicine’s name and look

Our name and graphic identity are vital parts of building and presenting our image. Protecting our logos and marks – that is, using them correctly and consistently – helps strengthen the image of Penn State Health and Penn State College of Medicine and the value we create for those we serve.

Penn State Health and Penn State College of Medicine logos with Nittany Lion mascot image in blue shield on the left.

Why we protect our name and images

Careful management and ongoing revitalization of our brand identity is necessary to effectively represent our ever-evolving health care system and make a clear, consistent and distinctive statement about the quality of our organization.

Our name and symbols represent past generations of achievement by our health care providers, scientists, faculty, students, staff and alumni – and the continued promise of excellence in our missions now and in the future.

Our ultimate goal is to make the Penn State Health brand mark one of the most recognizable health care symbols in the nation. Using Penn State Health’s logo correctly adds value to all those affiliated with it, bringing respect, trust, confidence, and economic benefit to our organization, our partners and our communities. Additionally, consistent use of a recognizable logo reinforces the overall positive identity of Penn State Health.

Using this standards guide

This guide answers the questions commonly associated with the use of Penn State Health and Penn State College of Medicine logos, trademarks, and word marks. You’ll find important information on the use of the name and image. You can also find detailed information about Penn State’s visual identity standards on the University’s Strategic Communications website.

If you need help

If you have questions about this information, contact the Office of Marketing and Communications at 717-531-8606 or Marketing&Communications@pennstatehealth.psu.edu.

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Logo Guidelines

Penn State Health and Penn State College of Medicine logos Expand answer

The Penn State Health and College of Medicine marks are based on the visual identity system of our parent University, Penn State.

The health system mark in its entirety consists of a “Penn State Health” logo type and a shield, as shown below. These elements are proportioned and positioned in a specific way. This precise arrangement may not be altered when featuring the entire mark. The official Penn State Health colors are blue specifically Hex #003087 (Pantone 287) and Hex #6CACE4 (PMS 284) and white.

Penn State Health and Penn State College of Medicine logos with Nittany Lion mascot image in blue shield on the left. Lines around Penn State Health logo to indicate the size of the mark, shield, and logo type.

The mark is used to identify everything we communicate through our websites, print communications, presentations, social media profiles, signs and other visual media. Having a clear and consistent visual identity helps build greater recognition for and awareness of Penn State Health and Penn State College of Medicine.

Never redraw or try to recreate the mark, including the shield or the logotype. Any modification of the mark diminishes its impact and weakens our legal protection. Only authorized artwork may be used.

Primary horizontal, two-color mark Expand answer

The primary mark is used in the majority of applications. Special-use marks shown below have an important but limited use.

Penn State Health logo with Nittany Lion mascot image in blue shield on the left.

Two vertical or centered marks below are reserved for special situations where formal center axis design would require the use of a vertical mark. There are other situations where the mark is used alone on an application, such as a folder cover, sweatshirt or cap. In these cases, a vertical mark may be more effective.

In the horizontal mark and vertical mark 1, the size relationship between the shield and the logotype are the same.

On the vertical mark 2, the logotype is smaller and above the shield. This allows for a larger, more powerful use of the shield. This version is very effective on some products and merchandise. This mark also can be useful when the width is restricted, as in a banner.

On right, Penn State Health logo with Nittany Lion mascot image in blue shield centered above the text to indicate special-use masks: Vertical mark 1. Middle Penn State Health logo with Nittany Lion mascot image in blue shield centered below it indicates Vertical mark 2 and on the right the Penn State Health logo with Nittany Lion mascot image in blue shield below text on a blue banner.

Special-use marks - vertical Expand answer

On left, Nittany Lion mascot inside blue shield which indicates special-use masks shield for use alone. On bottom left, Nittany Lion mascot inside blue shield over a white square background which indicates shield used as an avatar for social media. On right, Nittany Lion mascot inside blue shield over a light-blue rectangular background. Small Penn State Health logo on top left which indicates shield used as graphic element for full mark.

In general, the shield should not be used without the logotype. However, for certain uses, such as a pin or social media avatar, the use of the shield alone is appropriate.

Although the logotype is not used in these applications, the name does appear in close proximity.

The schematic folder cover demonstrates another opportunity to use the shield on its own as a graphic element. This design approach is only to be used when the full mark appears on the same surface.

 

Special-use marks: Social media avatars Expand answer

Avatar icons used on social media sites are as .jpgs.

On left, Nittany Lion mascot in blue shield over a white circle which indicates Penn State College of Medicine avatar use in circle. On right, Nittany Lion mascot image in blue shield above a Penn State Health logo over a white circle which indicates Penn State Health avatar use in circle.

The Penn State Health social media avatar is for all Penn State Health hospitals, medical groups, centers and institutes.

The Penn State College of Medicine social media avatar should use the shield-only avatar to follow Penn State’s consistent approach to brand architecture.

Unique avatars for special events or programs affiliated with Penn State Health or Penn State College of Medicine should not be used.

Email Marketing&Communications@pennstatehealth.psu.edu with any questions you may have.

 

Mark misuse: Avatar Expand answer

First row left, Nittany Lion mascot image in blue shield centered over a square white background, with text that reads Do not change the size of the avatar. First row right, Close-up of Nittany Lion mascot image inside blue square, with text that reads Do not crop the avatar. Second row left, Nittany Lion mascot image in blue shield in the upper-right corner of a square white background, with text that reads Do not reposition the avatar. Second row right, Nittany Lion mascot image in blue shield distorted over a square white background, with text that reads Do not distort or add special effects. Third row left, Nittany Lion mascot image in blue shield on a square white background. The words SPRING PICNIC are below the image, crossed out in red to show that names should not be added to the image, with text that reads Do not add any names to the avatar. Third row right, A color photograph of the Nittany Lion shrine carved in stone, with text that reads Do not use photographs as an avatar. Fourth row left, Nittany Lion mascot image in blude oval, with text that reads Do not use Athletics logo as the avatar.

The incorrect avatar use in this section is representative of the ways in which marks are often misused. The incorrect use of a mark tends to give license to, and spawn, other misuses.

 

Never redraw or try to recreate the avatar. Any modification of the shield diminishes its impact and weakens our legal protection. Only authorized artwork may be used.

 

Brand architecture: Tiers 1 and 2 Expand answer

Brand architecture is a powerful tool that allows us to connect the many entities within Penn State Health and Penn State College of Medicine in a clear and logical manner. We achieve this by creating a system of the entities that use the mark, as shown here. These entity marks include our campuses, colleges and many administrative or academic units.

Tier 1: We refer to Penn State as a Tier 1 mark because it is the overarching entity to which all other entities are connected. Likewise, Penn State Health is a Tier 1 mark because it serves as the master identity mark for all health system enterprises.

Tier 2: This tier includes Penn State College of Medicine and the various hospitals within Penn State Health. The typeface and size relationships in our marks have been carefully resolved to provide a strong presence for Penn State Health while allowing for the addition of the entity names.

The same principles on color use, clear space, minimum size, etc., shown through these standards apply to our entity marks, as well.

First row Penn State and Penn State Health logos with Nittany Lion mascot image in blue shield with text that reads Tier 1: Master brand mark Second row Penn State College of Medicine, Penn State Health St. Joseph, Penn State Cancer Institute, Penn State Health Rehabilitation logos with Nittany Lion mascot image in blue shield on the left with text that reads Tier 2: Hospital, System and College marks. Third row Penn State Health Children’s Hospital, Penn State Health St. Joseph Medical Center, Penn State Health Milton S. Hershey Medical Center and Penn State Health Medical Group Andrews Patel Hematology/Oncology logos with white Nittany Lion mascot image in blue shield with text that reads Tier 2 Hospital, System and College marks. Fourth row, Penn State Health Medical Group and Penn State Health Hampden Medical Center logos with white Nittany Lion mascot image in blue shield with text that reads Tier 2 Hospital, System and College marks.

First row, Penn State Health Children's Hospital logo with white Nittany Lion mascot image in blue shield. “Adolescent Medicine” text is on the right with text that reads Tier 2 Hospital and College marks and Tier 3 Entity name. Second row, Penn State Health Milton S. Hershey Medical Center with white Nittany Lion mascot image in blue shield on the left. Text “Surgery Otolaryngology” is on the right with text that reads Tier 2 and Tier 2 enetity name with Tier 4 entity name below. Third row, Penn State Health College of Medicine logo with white Nittany Lion mascot image in blue shield on the left. Text “Residency Program” is on the right in white letters on a blue rectangular background with text that reads Tier 2 and Tier 3 enetity name reversed out in white in blue shape.

It is possible to communicate and identify a Tier 3 without using it as part of an entity mark.

The schematic demonstrations in this section show different ways in which a Tier 3 entity can be used next to a Tier 2 entity.

The first example shows how the institute name can be used at a small size near the Penn State Health mark. In this example, and all examples in this section, note the Tier 3 name should never impinge on the clear space surrounding the marks. The names should be in Beaver Blue Hex #003087 (Pantone 287), Nittany Navy Hex #041E42 (Pantone 282), Pugh Blue Hex #6CACE4 (Pantone 284) or black Hex #00000, to be in harmony, and not compete, with the entity marks.

In some situations it may be useful to place the Tier 3 name large, as shown in the second example. Here we show Otolaryngology, the Tier 4 entity, linked with the Tier 3 name, Surgery, and the Tier 2 entity.

In the third example, we demonstrate how reversing the name out of a blue band can be an effective way of both linking and separating the Tier 2 and Tier 3 entities. Reversing the name in color out of a photograph is also a strong way of identifying our entities while communicating useful information.

Brand architecture: Tier 3, institutes and centers Expand answer

Institutes and centers are important entities within Penn State Health. If an institute or center is housed in Penn State Health St. Joseph Medical Center only. For example, use the St. Joseph Medical Center mark and separate the institute or center name from the main mark.

Penn State Health St. Joseph Medical Center logo with white Nittany Lion mascot image in blue shield on the left. Text “Heart Institute” is on the right.

If an institute or center is interdisciplinary, with more than one administrating medical center or medical group, use the Penn State Health mark and separate the institute or center name from the main marks.

Penn State Health logo with white Nittany Lion mascot image in blue shield is on the left. Text “Stroke Center” is on the right.

The purpose of these two systems is to allow the institutes to link back to Penn State Health. We want to avoid situations where two or more Penn State Health marks would be used with a single institute
or center.

Note the Tier 3 names should never impinge on the clear space surrounding our marks. The names should be in Beaver Blue Hex #003087 (Pantone 287), Nittany Navy Hex #041E42 (Pantone 282), Pugh Blue Hex #6CACE4 (Pantone 284) or black Hex #00000, to be in harmony, and not compete, with our entity marks.

Penn State Health logo with white Nittany Lion mascot image in blue shield. A line extending from the right shows where to place Theta Research Center. A line extending from the bottom shows Theta Research Center with Theta is all capital, light-blue letters.

The institutes, centers, departments and programs should not use highly distinctive symbols or logotypes. The examples shown here demonstrate how type treatment can be used to create visual interest and distinction without competing with the College or Penn State Health marks.

First row text that says Change of weight with Theta Research Center logo in black. Theta is in bold. Text that says Change of letter spacing Theta Research Center logo in black. Theta is all capitals. Second row text that says Change of color with Theta Research Center logo in blue. Theta is in all capitals and the words Research Center are below it. Text that says Change of placement with Theta Research Center logo in blue. Theta is in all capitals, and the words Research Center are to the right. Third row text that says Change of capitalization with Theta Research Center logo in black. Theta is in all capitals. Text that says Change of scale with Theta Research Center logo in black. Theta is in all capitals and the words Research Center are to the right. Fourth row left Penn State Health logo with white Nittany Lion mascot image in blue shield over a white long rectangle. Across the bottom of the rectangle is text “Theta Research Center” in white on a light blue background. Penn State College of Medicine logo with white Nittany Lion mascot image in blue shield over a white long rectangle. In the rectangle is the text “Welcome to the Center for the Study of Advanced Delta.”

The institute and centers should always be seen in context with the College of Medicine or Penn State Health marks.

Do not use entity marks similar to those below:

Do not use a Tier 3 name with an entity mark

Penn State Health Gamma Program and Penn State Health Medical Group Gamma Program logos with white Nittany Lion mascot image in blue shield. It has a red slash through it.

Do not use a Tier 4 name to replace a Tier 2 name in an entity mark

Penn State Health Human Resources and Penn State College of Medicine Gamma Department logos with white Nittany Lion mascot image in blue shield. It has a red slash through it.

The incorrect mark use in this section represents the ways that marks are often misused. The incorrect use of a mark tends to give license to, and spawn, other misuses.

Color: Mark use Expand answer

The two-color marks are the preferred versions, as they provide the most effective presentation. These two-color marks should be used whenever possible.

Our reverse-use marks are not simply the positive marks with a white logotype. The scale, position, and weights have been optically adjusted. Use the reverse-use marks for reverse applications.

The one-color blue mark can be used as a cost-effective alternative. The one-color black mark is permitted where printing in black is required, such as a newspaper ad.

Two-color mark with Beaver Blue Hex #003087 (Pantone 287) and Pugh Blue Hex #6CACE4 (Pantone 284), is the preferred color version. Top left: Penn State Health logo with white Nittany Lion mascot image in blue shield. Two-color reverse mark with Beaver Blue Hex #003087 (Pantone 287) and Pugh Blue Hex #6CACE4 (Pantone 284), is the preferred color version. Top right: Penn State Health logo with white Nittany Lion mascot image in blue shield over a black rectangle. One-color mark, Pantone 287 with screen middle row left, Penn State Health logo with white Nittany Lion mascot image in blue shield. One-color reverse mark, Pantone 287 and screen middle row right: Penn State Health logo with white Nittany Lion mascot image in blue shield over a black rectangle. One-color mark, black with screen bottom row left: Penn State Health logo with white Nittany Lion mascot image in blue shield in black. One-color reverse mark, black with screen bottom row right: Penn State Health logo with white Nittany Lion mascot image in blue shield in black over a black rectangle.

Color specifications Expand answer

Preferred two-color mark Beaver Blue Hex #003087 (Pantone 287) and Pugh Blue Hex #6CACE4 (Pantone 284) on left Penn State Health logo with white Nittany Lion mascot image in blue shield. Beaver Blue Hex #003087 (Pantone 287) with 30% screen in middle: Penn State Health logo with white Nittany Lion mascot image in blue shield. black Hex #00000 with 30% screen on right: Penn State Health logo with white Nittany Lion mascot image in blue shield in black.

In lieu of this color: Beaver Blue Use Pantone 287 or use CMYK—C 100, M 75, Y 2, K 18 or use RGB—R 0, G 48, B 135 or use Hex #003087. Pugh Blue Use Pantone 284 or use CMYK—C 59, M 17, Y 0, K 0 or use RGB—R 108, G 172, B 228 or use Hex #6CACE4. Black Use Pantone Black or use CMYK—C 63, M 62, Y 59, K 94 or use RGB—R 45, G 41, B 38 or use Hex #000000.

The preferred color version is the two-color mark with Beaver Blue Hex #003087 (Pantone 287) and Pugh Blue Hex #6CACE4 (Pantone 284). This two-color mark is preferred and should be used on most applications.

One-color applications may use Beaver Blue Hex #003087 (Pantone 287) with a 30% screen as a cost-saving measure, or black Hex #00000 with a screen, which is intended primarily for ads in newspapers or other inexpensive applications.

Logo artwork has been prepared for all color combinations demonstrated here. There is Pantone artwork for match-color printing, CMYK artwork for four-color process printing and RGB artwork for web and desktop computing applications.

The information in this section provides color code specifications to manage the mark colors in: Pantone, CMYK, RGB or Hex. Colors look different in application, from match-color to four-color process, from page to screen, and even coated to uncoated paper stocks. When trying to match our colors in other media, such as a thread for stitching or silkscreen, use the Pantone coated color swatch to match.

Full color palette Expand answer

Our color palette is broad to allow for the appropriate expression of our brand personality. This does not mean all colors should be used at once. In fact, such usage is not recommended. Use good design sense and work with the personality attributes in mind.

Penn State Health and Penn State College of Medicine Palette Tile of Beaver Blue 287-C 100, M 75, Y 2, K18-R 0, G 48, B 135-Hex #003087 Tile of Pugh Blue 284-C 59, M 17, Y 0, K 0-R 108, G 172, B 228-Hex #6CACE4 Tile of Nittany Navy 282-C 100, M 87, Y 42, K 52-R 9, G 31, B 64-Hex #091F40 Children’s Hospital Palette Tile of Jelly Bean Green 366-C 31, M 0, Y 51, K 0-R 183, G 221, B 121-Hex#B7DD79 Tile of Jelly Bean Orange 1495-C 0, M 46, Y 78, K 0-R 255, G143, B 28-Hex #FF8F1C Tile of Jelly Bean Pink 232-C 6,M 70, Y 0, K 0-R 233, G 60, B 172-Hex #E93CAC Tile of Jelly Bean Blue 2985-C 60, M 0, Y 3, K 0-R 91, G 194, B 231-Hex #5BC2E7 Lion Palette Tile of Lion Roar 1245-C 6, M 35, Y 99, K 18-R 198, G 146, B 20-Hex #C69214 Tile of Lion Shrine 4655-C 8, M 41, Y 51, K 20-R 191, G 148, B 116-Hex #BF9474

Color: Mark use on background colors Expand answer

We can use the mark on both light and dark colors. These colors examples are not part of a specific color palette but for demonstration purposes only.

This is possible because of the white outline around the shield, which provides a separation from the background and prevents common conflicts between marks and backgrounds with similar values or hues. The use of subtle textures is also possible.

In Figure 1, the positive-use mark with the blue logotype is used on a light background, and in Figure 2, the reverse logo has white logotype on a dark background. Also, placing the mark on another color or photographic background, like shown in Figure 3, is acceptable, as long as it adheres to the visual identity standards.

Figure 1 left: Penn State Health logo with white Nittany Lion mascot image in blue shield over a gray rectangle. Figure 2 middle: Penn State Health logo with white Nittany Lion mascot image in blue shield over a green rectangle. Figure 3 right: Penn State Health logo with white Nittany Lion mascot image in blue shield over a brown textured background rectangle.

Color specifications for mark use on background colors Expand answer

Penn State Health logo with white Nittany Lion mascot image in blue shield in seven different rectangles that are seven gradients of shade that range from white at the top to black at the bottom. Penn State Health logo on white, Penn State Health logo on 10% black, Penn State Health logo on 20% black, Penn State Health logo on 30% black. Mark for positive use on white or light color. Penn State Health logo with white Nittany Lion mascot image in blue shield over a light blue rectangle. Penn State Health logo on 40% black. Penn State Health logo on 70% black. Penn State Health logo on Black. Penn State Health logo with white Nittany Lion mascot image in blue shield over a dark blue rectangle. Mark for reverse use on dark color backgrounds. Penn State Health logo with white Nittany Lion mascot image in blue shield over a dark blue rectangle.

There are two marks: one for use on white or light color backgrounds, and one for use on dark backgrounds. They look very similar; however, the reverse mark is slightly smaller than the positive-use mark because the white outline makes the mark appear larger. The logotype also is drawn slightly thinner because white letters appear bolder than dark letters on white.

Simply put, they have been optically corrected. They are equally simple to use. Just remember to use the reverse mark on backgrounds that are darker than approximately 35% black, as shown to the right. This also applies to color backgrounds or simple background photographs.

The middle background values, from 30% to 40%, are the most challenging for the legibility of the logotype.

These background principles apply to the vertical marks, as well as all entity marks.

Never redraw or try to recreate the mark, including the shield or logotype. Any modification of the visual identity diminishes its impact and weakens our legal protection. Only authorized artwork may be used.

Special-use marks: One color without screen Expand answer

One color without any screens can be used for foil stamp printing, embroidery, embossing or debossing. It can be used in blue, black or white. These marks should not appear in other colors with the possible exception of silver or gold.

The use of the two-color primary horizontal mark is always preferable. While this one-color mark appears to be the same as the primary mark with the light blue removed, it has important differences.

Mark, one color without screen, top left: Penn State Health logo with white Nittany Lion mascot image in blue shield. Shield, one color without screen, top right: White Nittany Lion mascot image in blue shield. Vertical mark 1, one color without screen, bottom left: Penn State Health logo with white Nittany Lion mascot image in blue shield centered above the text. Vertical mark 2, one color without screen, bottom right: Penn State Health logo with white Nittany Lion mascot image in blue shield centered below the text.

Correct mark use: Minimum clear space Expand answer

Shield width—.5 Shield width—.25 Shield width, top right: White Nittany Lion mascot image in blue shield with dotted lines and gray boxes indicating the width of the shield in different places.

To effectively identify Penn State Health and Penn State College of Medicine communications, the marks must have visual presence.

One way to ensure the visual presence of the marks is to maintain a protected area or clear space surrounding them, where no other elements may be placed. Headlines, text, graphic elements, imagery and the edge of a page are not permitted within the clear space. The light gray square is set by the width of the shield, as shown, and the outer line defines the minimum clear space.

These minimum space requirements apply to the vertical marks and the shield when used alone. As shown, it also applies to the entity marks.

 

Recommended clear space at .5 width of the shield, top left: Penn State Health Milton S. Hershey Medical Center logo with white Nittany Lion mascot image in blue shield over a dotted-line rectangle with gray bars indicating width for spacing. Absolute minimum clear space at .25 width of the shield, bottom left: Penn State Health Children’s Hospital logo with white Nittany Lion mascot over a dotted-line rectangle and gray bars indicating width for spacing.

Correct mark use: Minimum size Expand answer

The size of the mark is important. A mark that is too large can appear aggressive and clumsy. A mark that is too small can appear weak.

The marks to the left are measured across the width of the shield. We use this dimension so that it can apply to the entity marks, as well. Most of our artwork is set up with a mark that is one inch wide and with a clear space of .5 inches or half a shield around the mark.

Key factors in determining the correct size include how the mark will be seen and what other information is included with the mark. In some cases, such as a sign, there may be a need to make the mark as large as possible. In other cases, such as stationery, print materials or our websites, the mark must clearly identify that it is from Penn State Health or Penn State College of Medicine without overpowering the other messages.

The horizontal mark should not be used with a shield smaller than .3 inches wide. Both of the vertical marks should not be used with a shield smaller than .5 inches.

1 inch shield width, top left: Penn State Health logo with white Nittany Lion mascot image in blue shield. A bracket indicates a 1-inch shield width. .75 inch shield width, upper left: Penn State Health logo with white Nittany Lion mascot image in blue shield. A bracket indicates a .75-inch shield width. .5 inch shield width, middle left: Penn State Health logo with white Nittany Lion mascot image in blue shield. A bracket indicates a .5 inch shield width. .4 inch shield width, lower left: Penn State Health logo with white Nittany Lion mascot image in blue shield. A bracket indicates a .4-inch shield width. Minimum size: .3 inch shield width, bottom left: Penn State Health logo with white Nittany Lion mascot image in blue shield. A bracket indicates a .3-inch shield width. Vertical marks minimum size: .5 inch shield width, Vertical mark 1, bottom middle: Penn State Health logo with white Nittany Lion mascot image in blue shield centered above text. A bracket indicates a minimum .5-inch shield width. Vertical mark 2, bottom right: Penn State Health logo with white Nittany Lion mascot image in blue shield centered below text. A bracket indicates a minimum .5-inch shield width.

Special-use marks: Product marks with ® Expand answer

The horizontal mark with two colors, as shown below, is the primary mark and is used in the majority
of applications. Special-use marks have an important but limited use.

The special-use marks shown below are used only on our products and merchandise. These items are often seen outside the context of Penn State and use the ® (registration mark) to provide legal protection.

Other uses, such as stationery, marketing materials, presentations, signs, and digital applications, are not required to, and should not, use the marks with ®.

Trademark designations are required for items that bear the Penn State Health mark and are for commercial use. Please contact licensing@psu.edu for questions related to Penn State merchandise.

The placement of the ® is only used in conjunction with the Penn State Health logotype, never with the shield.

The ® may be used with special-use marks, such as one color without screens.

The entity marks for the hospitals, health system, campuses, colleges and administrative/academic units do not have vertical marks. The marks should not be reconfigured as vertical marks.

Never redraw or try to recreate the mark, including the shield or logotype. Any modification of the mark diminishes its impact and weakens our legal protection. Only authorized artwork may be used.

Primary horizontal mark with ®, left: Penn State Health logo with white Nittany Lion mascot image in blue shield on the left and registered trademark symbol. Vertical mark 1 with ® middle: Penn State Health logo with white Nittany Lion mascot image in blue shield centered above text and registered trademark symbol. Vertical mark 2 with ®, right: Penn State Health logo with white Nittany Lion mascot image in blue shield centered below text and registered trademark symbol.

Alignment with the mark Expand answer

Careful placement of the mark is essential to correctly identify our organization’s communications. We want to avoid placement that seems arbitrary or indecisive. The alignments shown to the left have been used on our initial applications. The same alignment principles can apply to typography, imagery or graphic shapes. Aligning provides a sense of order and structure to the design.

The principles demonstrated here apply to the college, campus and administrative or academic unit marks.

It is not essential to use these alignment principles for all work. The key is to be aware of the importance of the placement of elements with the mark. Avoid situations where alignment is closely but not quite aligned, as this can appear to be a mistake.

Top left: Penn State Health logo with white Nittany Lion mascot image in blue shield on the left. Dotted lines show alignment of headline and text and image above and below the logo. Top right: Penn State Health logo with white Nittany Lion mascot image in blue shield on the left. Dotted lines show alignment of headline and text and image above and below the logo. Middle: Penn State Health logo with white Nittany Lion mascot image in blue shield on the left. Dotted lines show alignment of headline and text with the logo on left and right.

Mark on photographs Expand answer

The mark can be used on both light and dark photographs. This use is possible because of the white outline around the shield, which provides a separation from the background and prevents common conflicts between marks and backgrounds with similar values or hues.

  • Light backgrounds: use positive mark with the blue logotype
  • Dark backgrounds: use reverse mark with the white logotype

Bottom left: A photo showing a provider touching a patient’s neck while another provider looks on in an exam room. The Penn State Health logo with white Nittany Lion mascot image in blue shield on the left is at the top in blue. Bottom right: A photo shows the College of Medicine Crescent lit at night with the Penn State Health logo with white Nittany Lion mascot image in blue shield on the left at the top in white.

Mark misuse Expand answer

This page demonstrates the ways in which marks are often misused. The incorrect use of a mark tends to give license to, and spawn, other misuses.

Never redraw or try to recreate the mark, including the shield or logotype. Any modification of the mark diminishes its impact and weakens our legal protection. Only authorized artwork may be used.

Do not change the size relationship or position of the mark or logotype. Left first: Penn State Health logo in blue with white Nittany Lion mascot image in blue shield on the left shifted down. Do not reset the name in another font or color or add a word space, left second: Penn State Health logo in black with white Nittany Lion mascot image in blue shield on the left. Do not change the position or orientation of the mark, left third: Penn State Health logo in black with white Nittany Lion mascot image in blue shield on the right. Do not use any previous marks, left fourth: Former Penn State Hershey Milton S. Hershey Medical Center logo with Nittany Lion mascot image on rock in white atop a date. Do not change the color of the mark or logotype, left fifth: Penn State Health logo in black in a different font with white Nittany Lion mascot image in blue shield to left. Do not distort or add special effects to the mark, left sixth: Penn State Health logo in blue with distorted white Nittany Lion mascot image in blue shield to left.

Do not use the reverse artwork on a light background, right first: Penn State Health logo in white with white Nittany Lion mascot image in blue shield to left over a light blue rectangle. Do not use the positive artwork on a dark background, right second: Penn State Health logo in dark blue with white Nittany Lion mascot image in blue shield to left over a blue rectangle. Do not place the logo on a distracting pattern or image, right third: Penn State Health logo in white with white Nittany Lion mascot image in blue shield to left over a blue rectangle with darker blue vertical stripes. Do not remove the white shape behind the shield, right fourth: Penn State Health logo in blue with bright blue Nittany Lion mascot image in blue shield to left over a bright blue rectangle.

Do not remove the logotype, top left: Children’s Hospital logo with Nittany Lion mascot image in blue shield on left. Do not remove the shield, top middle: Penn State Health logo without Nittany Lion mascot image in shield. Do not place the department, program, center or institute name with an entity mark, top right: Penn State Health Gamma Department logo with white Nittany Lion mascot image in blue shield to the left. Do not create or add entity logo to our mark, second row left: Penn State Health logo with white Nittany Lion mascot image in blue shield with a large white A in a blue circle on the right. Do not create entity logos to replace the shield, second row middle: Penn State Health logo with a large white A in a blue circle on the left. Do not rearrange the hierarchy of our names or create other logos, Page 26, second row right: Gamma Center at Penn State Health logo with a large white A in a circle to the left. Do not create symbols for institute or centers or program, third row left: Theta Research Center logo and black and white with symbol to the left. Do not create logotypes for institutes or centers, third row right: Theta Research Center logo with text “THETA” in up-and-down lettering. Do not use an institute or center name in a distinctive shape, fourth row left: Theta Research Center logo centered over a green oval with a space between “THE” and “TA.” Do not use an institute or center name without having the College of Medicine or Penn State Health mark, fourth row right: Theta Research Center logo with a space between “THE” and “TA.”

Magnet logo use Expand answer

Having earned Magnet Recognition, Penn State Health is entitled to use the Magnet logo in promoting its clinical services. The Magnet logo should be used alongside the Milton S. Hershey Medical Center mark as a recognizable symbol of nursing excellence. The Magnet logo must be placed to the right of the Milton S. Hershey mark and no closer than half the width of the shield. Magnet marketing toolkit and the logo guidelines can be found on the American Nurses Credentialing Center website www.nursingworld.org/ancc.

The Magnet logo should not be used with Penn State College of Medicine or any hospital within Penn State Health that has not earned official Magnet recognition. The Magnet logo may be used so long as the Medical Center maintains its Magnet accreditation.

Penn State Health Milton S. Hershey Medical Center logo with white Nittany Lion mascot image in blue shield to the left and a green flag magnet logo to the right.

Co-branding with affiliates Expand answer

When Penn State Health, Penn State College of Medicine or other internal entity collaborates with entities outside Penn State Health, our entity’s logo may be placed alongside the partner logos, retaining the appropriate clear space. When multiple Penn State Health entities collaborate with entities outside Penn State Health, the Penn State Health logo should be used and may be placed alongside the partner logos, maintaining the appropriate clear space.

Penn State Health logo with white Nittany Lion mascot image in blue shield on the left and Highmark logo to the right.

Penn State Health logo with white Nittany Lion mascot image in blue shield below and Geisinger Holy Spirit logo above.

Penn State Children’s Hospital mark with secondary logos Expand answer

Sometimes, Penn State Children’s Hospital will endorse a partner organization such as Children’s Miracle Network or Four Diamonds. When the two entities’ logos appear together, the second organization’s logo should always be sized smaller than the Children’s Hospital logo unless it is used in an instance of co-branding in which the Children’s Hospital and the second organization are equal partners. The secondary logo may not be altered in any way.

In terms of placement, the secondary logo must be no closer to the Penn State Children’s Hospital mark than a minimum of .25 the width of the shield, a .5 width is preferred.

Penn State Health Children’s Hospital logo with white Nittany Lion mascot image in blue shield to the right and Children’s Miracle Network Hospitals logo to the right. Dotted lines between the logos show appropriate spacing. Bottom right: Penn State Health Children’s Hospital logo with white Nittany Lion mascot image in blue shield to the left and Four Diamonds Conquering Childhood Cancer logo to the right. Dotted lines between the logos show appropriate spacing.

Children’s Hospital paw print Expand answer

Outline of a blue paw print.

This paw print may be used as an additional graphic element for Penn State Children’s Hospital materials. It must be rendered as a four-toed paw and should only be reproduced using master artwork provided by the Office of Marketing and Communications. The paw print may be used independent of the Penn State Children’s Hospital mark but should never be presented as the Children’s Hospital logo.

 

Gallery: Typography Expand answer

Typography

Typography is an essential component of the brand identity. Used consistently and effectively, typography distinguishes and adds personality to communications, in addition to ensuring legibility.

For most print applications, we use Berkeley and Fruitiger font families. Fruitiger font is the recommended sans serif font for use in print communications. Berkeley font is a classic serif with a large x-height in the lowercase letters.

If Fruitiger and Berkeley fonts are not available in your system, you may use Garamond and Trebuchet, respectively, as a substitute. All professional designers should use Fruitiger and Berkeley.

For our marks, we use custom typefaces that are not available for other uses.

Type families for web use

Roboto Sans is Penn State Health’s choice of font for the Web. This is controlled by the enterprise web portal for consistency across all web pages.

Roboto Sans

Type families for web use Expand answer

Verdana is Penn State Health’s choice of font for online and digital use. This is controlled by the enterprise web platforms for consistency across all webpages.

Berkeley font family:  This font family is an all-purpose classic font that is easy to read in the body text.

Frutiger font family: This font family provides a wide range of typefaces that offer multiple type needs, from ultra-bold headlines to easy-to-read body text.

Typography

Roboto Sans is Penn State Health’s choice of font for the Web. This is controlled by the enterprise web portal for consistency across all web pages.

Roboto Sans

Gallery: Website Expand answer

This gallery provides examples of work that not only adheres to the visual identity standards but is also strong, creative and effective. The Hershey Medical Center homepage uses the mark large, with clear space around it.

Image of Penn State Health Milton S. Hershey Medical Center website homepage. A woman nurse stands and smiles at a woman patient.

Gallery: Social media Expand answer

Image of Penn State Health College of Medicine Facebook page. Image shows speaker talking in front of a large audience in an auditorium. Image of Penn State Health St. Joseph Facebook page. Image shows Nittany Lion statue in front of St. Joseph Medical Center.

Gallery: Merchandise Expand answer

This image of a mug demonstrates how the vertical mark can be used. The focus on the large graphic image of the shield works well here, while still keeping our name visible.

Trademark designations are required for items that bear the Penn State Health mark and are for commercial use. Please contact the Office of Marketing and Communications for questions related to Penn State Health or Penn State College of Medicine merchandise.

Penn State Health Milton S. Hershey Medical Center logo with white Nittany Lion mascot image in blue shield on left printed on a dark blue zippered coin bag. Right image Penn State Health Milton S. Hershey Medical Center logo with white Nittany Lion mascot image in blue shield on left printed on a coffee mug.

Uniform apparel Expand answer

Penn State Health logo with white Nittany Lion mascot image in blue shield on left is printed on the front-left side of provider’s white coat. The provider’s name and department are printed on the right side of the coat. Middle image Penn State Health Milton S. Hershey Medical Center logo with white Nittany Lion mascot image in blue shield on left is printed on the front-left side of provider’s white coat. The provider’s name and department name are printed on the right side of the coat. Bottom image: Penn State Health Milton S. Hershey Medical Center logo with white Nittany Lion mascot image in blue shield on left is printed on the front-left side of a light blue polo shirt. The department name is printed on the right side of the shirt. All text is in white.

All uniform apparel shall carry the Penn State Health or Penn State College of Medicine mark on the left chest. These items include, but are not limited to, lab coats, scrubs, polo shirts and jackets.

The unit name will appear embroidered on the right breast of the uniform. The name and title of the individual may be embroidered on the left breast of the uniform, if required.

For quality assurance and compliance purposes, all official uniform apparel must be produced in coordination with the Medical Center’s Linen Services. Penn State Health and Penn State College of Medicine employees and faculty may order online through the Linen Services page of the Infonet: infonet.pennstatehershey.net/web/linen/home. This link is available to Penn State Health and Penn State College of Medicine employees and faculty only. All others should call Linen Services at 717-531-8320.

Standards for stationery at Printing Services Digital Storefront Expand answer

To present a consistent image for Penn State Health and Penn State College of Medicine, all departments and offices will use the official letterhead, envelopes and business cards. Tier 1 and 2 marks can be on the stationery. Tier 3, that is composed of the entity name, must be referenced above the address area. All stationery must be ordered through Penn State Health Printing Services, which is responsible for the consistent application of the stationery formats. To order, access the Penn State Health Printing Services Digital Storefront at psh.myprintdesk.net/dsf.

Penn State Health logo with white Nittany Lion mascot image in blue shield to the left at the top left of letterhead, with provider name, title, locations and contact information on the top-right. Right: Penn State Health logo and entity name with white Nittany Lion mascot image in blue shield at the top left of a business card, with provider name, title, locations and contact information across the bottom. Top-left: Penn State Health logo and entity name and white Nittany Lion mascot image in blue shield at the top-left of an envelope.

Design System Components

Component overview Expand answer

Top: Penn State Health Cancer Institute logo with white Nittany Lion mascot image in blue shield at left in white text on a blue background. To the right is a photo of a male researcher wearing a lab coat and looking through a microscope. Bottom left: Orthopaedic Surgery at Penn State Health Milton S. Hershey Medical Center printed at the top of a trifold brochure that shows a male provider looking at an older woman patient. Bottom right: Penn State Health Children’s Hospital logo. with white Nittany Lion mascot image in blue shield at left in white text on a blue background. To the right is the U.S. News & World Report Best Children’s Hospitals for Orthopedics 2016-17 banner in gold.The Penn State Health design system has been developed to help reinforce the brand. It creates a consistent appearance for all our communications, and helps people differentiate our materials from other organizations’ materials.

The examples on the right show the flexibility of the design system in context.

For printed materials, the logo should be positioned at the bottom of the first viewable surface. The approximate size of the logo on the brochure cover is 2 inches wide.

The connected line elements below are unifying graphic lines that should be incorporated in all Penn State Health materials. On a typical brochure or a one-sheet document, the approximate line weight is 15 points. On our websites the lines can be used as a navigation bar or can be incorporated into an image or content. The linear element can be positioned vertically or horizontally.

 

Writing Style and Web Guidelines

Editorial style - for written communications Expand answer

The Office of Marketing and Communications uses Associated Press style to maintain consistent content that presents a positive image of Penn State Health and Penn State College of Medicine.

The Associated Press Stylebook provides an A-Z guide to issues such as capitalization, abbreviation, punctuation, spelling, numerals and many other questions of language usage.

Use of Penn State Health and Penn State College of Medicine images on our websites Expand answer

The Office of Marketing and Communications maintains images for use on Penn State Health and Penn State College of Medicine websites. All contents and images are protected by copyright and are the exclusive property of Penn State Health or Penn State College of Medicine. Vendors and others wishing to use any Penn State Health or College of Medicine images must receive prior approval from the Office of Marketing and Communications by calling 717-531-8606 or emailing Marketing&Communications@pennstatehealth.psu.edu Images from the online health library are provided by a vendor service and may be used on our webpages without any alteration.

Downloadable PDF documents posted on our websites Expand answer

The use of downloadable PDF documents is common from a website. Any PDF document that will be downloadable from our website should be identified as a Penn State Health or Penn State College of Medicine document by including, at a minimum, an approved mark. It is also advisable to indicate the date of publication and copyright reference. Providing alterable documents (such as Word, Excel and PowerPoint) not converted to PDF format is risky and should be avoided. Including a proper mark, date of publication and copyright reference before converting documents to PDF format is strongly encouraged. Use of downloadable documents limits the ability of website visitors using mobile devices to view or use these documents and is not generally compliant with policies ensuring accessibility to people with disabilities. Informational documents should be published as webpages whenever possible.

Other items to consider Expand answer

All online publishing for Penn State Health and Penn State College of Medicine websites is managed by Web Solutions or designated parties at other entities. Requests for online content updates, including video, should be directed to Web and Digital Services.

Third-party advertising or commercial promotion is not permitted on Penn State Health and Penn State College of Medicine domains. All websites on the Penn State Health and Penn State College of Medicine domains must comply with the organization’s legal and copyright statement.

Use by other organizations and groups Expand answer

Requests to make use of Penn State Health and Penn State College of Medicine name and images may be received from organizations, businesses and groups not affiliated with Penn State, Penn State Health or Penn State College of Medicine. Such requests may be made in connection with consumer products or services, fundraising, sponsorship of activities, advertising, marketing or for other purposes.

All requests must be submitted to and approved by the chief marketing officer in consultation with the University Licensing Programs Office and, in some circumstances, Penn State Health’s legal counsel. If approved, a written license agreement with the organization or group will be required. In some instances, payment of a royalty fee may be required, if such use is approved. Approval for using the Penn State Health and College of Medicine names and marks is at the sole and unrestricted discretion of Penn State Health and the College of Medicine. Usage, in this regard, pertains to consumer products, fundraising, corporate sponsors, local businesses, news and media services.

Penn State Health and Penn State College of Medicine’s names and images cannot be used by or on behalf of a political candidate, political party, political action committee or a committee formed to support a political candidate.

Checklist of usage considerations Expand answer

Before using Penn State Health and Penn State College of Medicine’s names and images, it is important to consider whether the use would be supportive of Penn State Health and the College of Medicine’s missions, reputations and values.

As you consider specific situations, ask yourself whether the use of Penn State Health and Penn State College of Medicine’s name and marks would accomplish the following:

  • support Penn State Health and Penn State College of Medicine’s missions of patient care, research, education and community engagement.
  • reflect Penn State Health and Penn State College of Medicine’s commitment to the values of honesty, integrity and compassion.
  • preserve Penn State Health and Penn State College of Medicine’s reputations as recognized leaders in health research and services to the community.
  • be in compliance with Penn State Health and Penn State College of Medicine’s policies and codes of conduct.
  • show respect for people, particularly physicians, nurses, employees, faculty members and students.

Penn State Health and Penn State College of Medicine Writing Style Guide - Naming and Nomenclature Guidelines

Locations and institutions Expand answer

Penn State Health –  references the health system (see Boilerplate for details)

  • “the health system” may be used on subsequent references if it is the only health system mentioned in a piece of copy
  • Should never be shortened on subsequent references
  • Should not be abbreviated (see Acronyms)

Penn State Health Milton S. Hershey Medical Center – first reference

  • The Milton S. Hershey Medical Center – second reference. “The” is preferable and does not need to be capitalized.
  • Hershey Medical Center – subsequent references (Do not use “the.”)
  • To reflect and give proper credit to the original 1963 deeded gift that created the Hershey campus, the full legal name “The Milton S. Hershey Medical Center” must always be used on first reference to operations at the original Hershey campus, including activities of Penn State College of Medicine. An official logo that includes the full Milton S. Hershey Medical Center name can suffice as a first reference when used in conjunction with other units based on the Hershey campus.
  • The Milton S. Hershey Medical Center name is used in contracts, legal documents and as required by the Articles of Trust for the Milton S. Hershey Medical Center. “Penn State Health Milton S. Hershey Medical Center” is also acceptable as a legal name.
  • Never use “Penn State Hershey.”
  • For external communications, avoid using the term “Medical Center” because Penn State Health has several different medical centers.
  • For internal communications that refer only to Hershey Medical Center, it is acceptable to use “Medical Center” on the second or third reference. “Medical Center” should be capitalized.

Penn State Health St. Joseph – refers to the entire Reading enterprise

  • Penn State Health St. Joseph Medical Center – first reference
  • St. Joseph Medical Center – subsequent references
  • St. Joseph Medical Group – refers to outpatient practice sites of Penn State Health St. Joseph.
  • Never use “St. Joe’s.

Penn State Children’s Hospital – first reference

  • the Children’s Hospital – subsequent references
  • NOT Penn State Health Children’s Hospital (“Health” is used with the name only in the logo)

Penn State Health Rehabilitation Hospital

Penn State Health Medical Group

Outpatient practices associated with Penn State Health are considered part of Penn State Health Medical Group. The Medical Group name refers to the overall collection of practices, as well as the individual practices. Each individual practice is referenced with a specific site identifier. Use an en dash before the site identifier with a space before and after the en dash. The Medical Group name and location identifier does not reflect services offered there.

Community Practice Division

The Penn State Health Medical Group, Community Practice Division refers to outpatient practices that are not part of Penn State Health Milton S. Hershey Medical Center and therefore not part of the Academic Practice Division. Never use the term “Community Medical Group.”

Example of job title:
Dr. William Bird, senior vice president, Penn State Health Medical Group, Community Practice Division

Examples of Community Practice Division locations:

  • Penn State Health Medical Group – Cornerstone
  • Penn State Health Medical Group – Lime Spring
  • Penn State Health Medical Group – White Rose

Academic Practice Division

The Penn State Health Medical Group, Academic Practice Division refers to outpatient practices associated with Penn State Health Milton S. Hershey Medical Center.

Example of job title:
Corby Myers, senior director of quality, compliance and patient safety, Penn State Health Medical Group, Academic Practice Division

Examples of Academic Practice Division locations:

  • Penn State Health Medical Group – Benner Pike
  • Penn State Health Medical Group – Briarcrest
  • Penn State Health Medical Group – Camp Hill

Exception to use of en dash:

Penn State Health Medical Group at St. Joseph Medical Center

See Appendix B on this page for a full list of Penn State Health Medical Group locations.

Two Medical Group Locations

If referencing more than one Medical Group practice in the same sentence, it is not necessary to repeat the Medical Group name. The practice locations should follow Penn State Health Medical Group in alphabetical order. The Medical Group name does not become plural.

Example:

Penn State Health Medical Group sites in Camp Hill, Elizabethtown and Palmyra.

Penn State Health Medical Group includes two divisions based on provider employment structures. These divisions may be referenced internally and with corporate partners, but to avoid confusion, the singular Penn State Health Medical Group name should be used in all public-and consumer-facing materials and messaging.

  • Penn State Health Medical Group, Faculty Practice
  • Penn State Health Medical Group, Community Practice

Should be used in conjunction with “on the campus of Penn State Health Milton S. Hershey Medical Center” on first reference in connection with programs or activities in Hershey.

Penn State College of Medicine – first reference

  • Penn State College of Medicine University Park Curriculum is exempt from this reference.
  • College of Medicine – subsequent references

Do not use formal first references of organization names for internal use, unless it is necessary for clarity. Instead of the formal name, use “College of Medicine.”

Centers and Institutes

Do not include “the” before most Penn State Health entity names.

A “center” is typically defined as two or more clinical departments that are focused on a particular issue. Centers should include “Health” in the name.

Examples:

  • Penn State Health Breast Center
  • Penn State Health Eye Center
  • Penn State Health Endoscopy Center
  • Penn State Health IBD Center
  • Penn State Health Melanoma Center
  • Penn State Health Sleep Research and Treatment Center
  • Penn State Health Sports Medicine
  • Penn State Health Stroke Center
  • Penn State Health Wound Center
  • Exception: Penn State Center for Research on Tobacco and Health

An “institute” is defined as two more centers or programs that are focused on a particular issue. An institute is at the university level, so it does not include “Health” in the name.

Examples:

  • Penn State Bone and Joint Institute
  • Penn State Cancer Institute
  • Penn State Center for the Protection of Children
  • Penn State Clinical and Translational Science Institute
  • Penn State Heart and Vascular Institute

The following entities should not have “Health” in the name:

  • Penn State Children’s Hospital
  • Penn State Sports Medicine
  • Penn State Center for the Protection of Children

First reference: use full institute or center name

Second reference

  • the institute
  • the center

Children’s Miracle Network

  • No “The” before Children’s Miracle Network
  • Children’s Miracle Network at Penn State Children’s Hospital on first reference; CMN on subsequent reference
  • The annual fundraising event called “telethon” is lowercased when not used together with the formal organization name.

Four Diamonds

  • NOT Four Diamonds Fund

Penn State – first reference

  • NOT Penn State University
  • The University – subsequent references. “The” does not need to be capitalized.
  • The Pennsylvania State University is reserved for formal or legal documents (diplomas, contracts, etc.)
  • Capitalize “The” when used as part of the University’s full name: The Pennsylvania State University
Departments and programs Expand answer

Generally speaking, departments, divisions or sections should not be combined with the Penn State Health master brand because they are aligned with a hospital or the college rather than the health system as a whole. It is not necessary to use “Department, “Office” or “Program” as part of the name, especially for external audiences who are focused on our services, not our structure.

Examples:

  • Preferred construction: Neurosurgery at Penn State Health Milton S. Hershey Medical Center
    Alternate construction: The Department of Neurosurgery at Penn State Health Milton S. Hershey Medical Center
  • Preferred construction: Facilities at Penn State Health Milton S. Hershey Medical Center
    Alternate construction: The Department of Facilities at Penn State Health Milton S. Hershey Medical Center
  • Preferred construction: Penn State College of Medicine Office of Medical Education
    Alternate construction: The Office of Medical Education at Penn State College of Medicine
  • Preferred construction: Transplant at Penn State Health Milton S. Hershey Medical Center
    Alternate construction: The Transplant Program at Penn State Health Milton S. Hershey Medical Center

*Capitalize departments only when using their formal, official name

Examples:

  • a professor in the Department of Radiology
  • a professor of radiology (not capitalized)
  • a professor in the radiology department
  • Department of Surgery vs. surgery department or surgery
  • Division of Artificial Organs vs. artificial organs division
  • Be careful not to confuse department and division.

Entrances or other points of reference usually are not capitalized unless they are a proper noun or name:

  • The hospital main entrance
  • The north entrance
  • The College of Medicine entrance (but “the College entrance”)
  • The rotunda (but “the Rotunda Café”)
  • The Junker Auditorium (but “the hospital auditorium” or “the auditorium”)
Summary Expand answer

First reference:

  • Penn State Health Milton S. Hershey Medical Center
  • Penn State College of Medicine
  • Penn State Health St. Joseph
  • Penn State Children’s Hospital
  • Penn State Health Medical Group
  • Penn State Bone and Joint Institute
  • Penn State Cancer Institute
  • Penn State Clinical and Translational Science Institute
  • Penn State Heart and Vascular Institute (do not use ampersand)
  • Penn State Institute for Personalized Medicine
  • Penn State Melanoma Center
  • Penn State Neuroscience Institute
  • Penn State Stroke Center

Second or familiar references:

  • The Milton S. Hershey Medical Center
  • Hershey Medical Center
  • the College of Medicine; the College
  • St. Joseph Medical Center
  • St. Joseph Medical Group
  • the health system
  • the Cancer Institute
  • the Children’s Hospital
  • the Heart and Vascular Institute

Third or familiar references:

  • the Medical Center – “The” does not need to be capitalized
Referencing multiple entities Expand answer

When referencing more than one Penn State Health or Penn State College of Medicine entity in the same sentence, the master brand is used only once. The order of priority is as follows: the Medical Center should appear first, followed by the College of Medicine, followed by the health system. After that, entities should be shown alphabetically, with hospitals and institutes ranking above centers, the Medical Group, departments, divisions and services.

Examples:

  • Penn State Health Milton S. Hershey Medical Center and health network
  • Penn State Health Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, Penn State College of Medicine and health network
  • Penn State Health Milton S. Hershey Medical Center and Penn State Children’s Hospital
  • Penn State Cancer Institute and Penn State Children’s Hospital
  • Penn State Children’s Hospital and Orthopaedics

Joint ventures

Penn State Health is engaged in joint venture initiatives with external partners. Because the multiple brand names of all parties involved in these joint ventures may require a specific naming solution, nomenclature guidelines for these situations will be handled on a case-by-case basis.

Examples:

  • Penn State Health Neurosurgery at Geisinger Holy Spirit
  • Penn State Health Heart and Vascular at Geisinger Holy Spirit

People

Full name, credentials on first reference

Example: Sharon Silver, MD

Associated Press Stylebook recommends minimizing use of credentials when possible

  • Dr. Sharon Silver – to the layperson, the title “Dr.” means a medical degree, whether MD, DO, etc, so generally, “Dr.” should not be used for PhDs or others who hold a doctorate.
  • Sharon Silver, a licensed practical nurse, …
  • Sharon Silver, who holds a PhD in engineering, …
  • Use last name only on second reference: “Silver said she thought, ….” In some internal memos and publications, using the title “Dr.” with the last name is appropriate

For internal memos that are more personal in nature, using a person’s first name on subsequent references is acceptable:

  • Please join me in welcoming Marie to Penn State Health.

Do not include employee’s middle initial unless the employee specifically requests it.

Job titles are not capitalized, unless they come directly before the person’s name:

  • Chief Nursing Officer Jane Jones attended the meeting Jane Jones, chief nursing officer, attended the meeting The hospital’s chief nursing officer, Jane Jones, attended

Do not use credentials for nurses in most external-facing materials

  • Roles are not titles and should not be capitalized

Examples:

  • The nurse said (not the Nurse said)
  • The doctor told us to (not the Doctor told us to)
  • The operator forwarded a call (not the Operator forwarded a call)

Identify providers with the name of the hospital rather than the institute or center. For example, say “Dr. John Smith, a cardiologist at Penn State Health Milton S. Hershey Medical Center” rather than “Dr. John Smith, a cardiologist at Penn State Heart and Vascular Institute.

When employees have both a clinical title and Penn State College of Medicine title, use the clinical title first:

Example:

  • Dr. Janet Smith, gastroenterologist at Penn State Health Milton S. Hershey Medical Center and associate professor at Penn State College of Medicine.

Leadership titles

Refer to the following:

Quick Reference: Penn State Health Writing Style

General rules Expand answer
  • Do not use serial/Oxford comma.
  • Avoid using the second-person point-of-view, such as “You should sign up” or “Our medical center” in most articles and clinical and operational information. Instead, use the third-person point of view, such as “Employees are invited to sign up” or “The medical center.”
  • Do not use “will be held” or “was held.” Instead, say “will take place” or “took place,” or “is scheduled on.”
  • On vs. for:

Examples:

  • Staff nurse for the Nursing Vascular Access team – not “Staff nurse on the Nursing Vascular Access team.”
  • Chair: Use chair, not chairman or chairwoman.
  • chair of the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at Penn State College of Medicine.
Accent marks Expand answer

Use accent marks per Webster’s New World College Dictionary.

Example: The name Cézanne is written with an acute accent mark.

Abbreviations and acronyms Expand answer
  • Avoid using abbreviations and acronyms, which can lead to confusing, unclear and inefficient communication.
  • If an acronym is necessary and is used at least twice in the article, spell out the full name on first reference, followed by the acronym in parentheses.
    • Example: Patients with sleep apnea may use a continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) device.
  • Internally, people may use abbreviations and acronyms commonly known to a specific group when communicating with that group. Abbreviations and acronyms should be limited otherwise to use only when space or time is critically limited and understanding of the abbreviation or acronym can be reasonably assumed for a large part of the intended audience.
    • Examples: NASA, ACLU, USA
  • Abbreviations and acronyms may also be used for clinical communication systems and emergency alerting.
  • In memos and other internal communication materials, faculty, staff, and students should use full names to refer to various units or entities with the health system and College of Medicine. They should not use acronyms such as “COM,” HVI,” “PSHMC” or “STJ.”
  • While this practice is negotiable for internal purposes, abbreviations should never be used to publicly reference these or any other Penn State Health or College of Medicine entity. Abbreviations can be useful for individuals with a high degree of familiarity with our organization, but they will more than likely confuse or fail to inform external audiences.
  • Avoid using the acronym ED. Instead, use emergency department.
  • Entity names should not be truncated to acronym form unless space is limited, such as on an electronic form. The acronym should be simplified and clearly stated up front:
    • Examples:
      • MSHMC (for the Milton S. Hershey Medical Center)
      • STJ (for St. Joseph)
      • PSHMG (for Penn State Health Medical Group)
  • Building and location names should be spelled out to avoid confusion among employees, patients and visitors.
    • Examples:
      • Academic Support Building (avoid ASB)
      • University Physician Center (avoid UPC)
      • St. Joseph Medical Office Building (avoid MOB)
Academic medical center Expand answer

The Milton S. Hershey Medical Center should be described as an academic medical center. Penn State Health is a university-affiliated health system.

Academic Practice Division and Community Practice Division Expand answer
  • Do not refer to Penn State Health Medical Group practices as “the Academic Medical Group” or “the Community Medical Group” on any public-facing materials. This differentiation is confusing to the public and most Penn State Health employees.
  • Instead, refer to them as “Academic Practice Division” and “Community Practice Division.”
  • Example of job title:
    Dr. William Bird, senior vice president, Penn State Health Medical Group, Community Practice Division
  • For internal memos, use the following wording to refer to the academic practice division: “Penn State Health Medical Group academic practice division” or “those practice sites associated with the Milton S. Hershey Medical Center.”
  • For weather alerts, use the following wording: “Sites associated with the Penn State Health academic practice division or community practice division”.
Addresses Expand answer
  • Use the abbreviations Ave., Blvd. and St. only with a numbered address: 1600 Pennsylvania Ave.
  • Spell them out and capitalize when part of a formal street name without a number: Pennsylvania Avenue.
  • List 30 Hope Drive and 35 Hope Drive on the Hershey campus as follows:
    Penn State Health Milton S. Hershey Medical Center
    30 Hope Drive
    East Health Campus
    Entrance B, Suite 2200
    Hershey, PA
  • When noting entrances and suite numbers, put the entrance first, then the suite number.
  • List Penn State Health St. Joseph Medical Office Building as follows:
    Penn State Health St. Joseph
    Medical Office Building
    2494 Bernville Road, Suite 103
    Reading, PA 19605
Advanced practice providers Expand answer

Advanced practice providers (APP) include physician assistants and advanced practice registered nurses. Do not refer to them as advanced practice clinicians (APC).

Alternative text Expand answer

Alternative (alt) text is descriptive text that enables users who are sight-impaired to identify an image. It should be included with all photos.

Example: Physical therapist Andrea Bearinger and nurse Angela Zimmerman lean over and smile at an elderly patient lying in a hospital bed. A monitor is visible above their heads.

See Appendix A on this page for instructions on how to write alt text. For accessibility guidelines, refer to Penn State accessibility guidelines.

Board-certified physician Expand answer

Use a hyphen between the following:

  • Board-certified physician
  • …she is board-certified.
Building locations Expand answer

The following acronyms are used for buildings on the Hershey Medical Center campus:

  • H – hospital – Hershey Medical Center
  • C – College
  • P – Children’s Hospital
  • MB – Main Building (hospital and college)
  • T – Cancer Institute
  • ASB – Academic Support Building
  • BMR – Biomedical Research Center
  • UPC – University Physician Center
  • UFC – University Fitness Center

Insert a comma between a building location and room number.

Example:

  • Junker Auditorium, Room HG316
Bullet points Expand answer
  • Make bullet points consistent in structure – all sentences or all fragments.
  • Capitalize the first word of each bullet point unless it is a continuation of a sentence.
    • Example: See your doctor for the best:
      • advice
      • treatment
      • follow-up care
  • If bullet points are all sentences, end each with a period.
    • Example: Advocating for your care begins with effective communication:
      • Understand the roles of the care team members – and that you have a right to ask why someone is in your room.
      • Ask questions until you fully understand the plan of care.
      • Attend rounds, during which the attending doctor, residents, medical students and nurses meet to discuss your condition and give you an update.
  • If bullet points are all fragments, do not use any end punctuation, even after the final bullet point.
    • Example:
      • The risk of heart disease increases due to the following factors:
      • High blood pressure
      • Obesity
      • High blood cholesterol
      • Smoking
      • Physical inactivity
  • Do not end bullet points with semicolons.
  • Number bullet points when you have more than five.
  • Avoid using transition words and phrases such as “secondly” or “another point.”
Capitalization Expand answer
  • Use the latest versions of Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary and the AP Stylebook to check on capitalization of non-Penn State-related words.
  • Do not capitalize academic titles unless the title appears before a person’s name. Initial-capped academic titles are acceptable in certain instances of correspondence or formal invitations.
CareLine Expand answer

Penn State Health’s CareLine is one word.

Central PA vs. central Pennsylvania Expand answer

In narrative copy use “central Pennsylvania.” In ad copy it is acceptable to use “Central PA.”

Commencement/semester Expand answer
  • Commencement is lowercase:
    • Examples:
      • spring commencement
      • fall commencement
  • Semester is lowercase:
    • Examples:
      • spring semester
      • fall semester
Commonwealth Expand answer
  • Pennsylvania is a commonwealth, not a state.
  • Lowercase “the” and “c” in “the commonwealth…”
Comprised Expand answer

Avoid using the word “comprised.” Instead, use “consists of,” “includes”or “is made up of.”

Credentials Expand answer
  • AP Stylebook recommends minimizing the use of credentials when possible.
  • Do not use “MD” or “DO” after a physician’s name. Instead, use “Dr.” before the name. The only exceptions to this rule are internal memos and tabular materials, such as event programs, lists of award winners in an article and photo captions in grant award articles.
  • Do not use periods in degrees, including MD and PhD.
  • Use physician’s last name only on second reference.
  • To the layperson the title “Dr.” means a medical degree, so do not use “Dr.” for PhDs or others who hold a doctorate. Instead, use the individual’s title.
    • Examples:
      • Sharon Silver, who holds a PhD in engineering, …
      • “…who holds a doctorate in engineering.”
  • Do not use credentials for nurses in most external-facing materials. This is consistent with Penn State style.
    • Example: Sharon Silver, a licensed practical nurse, …
  • The only exceptions to this rule are internal memos, publications and tabular materials, such as event programs, lists of award winners in an article and photo captions in grant award articles.
Currency Expand answer

Currency format: $35 (not $35.00).

Dates Expand answer
  • Abbreviate months according to AP Stylebook.

Example: The gym is extending its hours beginning Tuesday, Jan. 2.

  • After an event occurs, use the date only, not the day of the week.
  • Use comma after year in the middle of a sentence.
    • Example:– On Jan. 23, 2019, Penn State…
  • Do not start an article with the date at the beginning of the first sentence.
Days of week Expand answer
  • Use day of week for dates that are in the future.
    • Example: Wednesday, Feb. 6 for future date. Feb. 6 for past date.
  • Always check that the day of the week is correct for the date.
Departments and programs Expand answer
  • Generally speaking, departments, divisions or sections should not be combined with the Penn State Health master brand because they are aligned with the medical center or college rather than the health system as a whole. It is not necessary to use “Department, “Office” or “Program” as part of the name, especially for external audiences, who are focused on our services, not our structure.
    • Examples:
      • Preferred construction: Neurosurgery at Penn State Health Milton S. Hershey Medical Center
      • Alternate construction: The Department of Neurosurgery at Penn State Health Milton S. Hershey Medical Center
      • Preferred construction: Facilities at Penn State Health Milton S. Hershey Medical Center
      • Alternate construction: The Department of Facilities at Penn State Health Milton S. Hershey Medical Center
      • Preferred construction: Penn State College of Medicine Office of Medical Education
      • Alternate construction: The Office of Medical Education at Penn State College of Medicine
      • Preferred construction: Transplant at Penn State Health Milton S. Hershey Medical Center
      • Alternate construction: The Transplant Program at Penn State Health Milton S. Hershey Medical Center
  • Capitalize departments only when using their formal, official name.
    • Examples:
      • a professor in the Department of Radiology
      • a professor of radiology (not capitalized)
      • Department of Surgery vs. surgery department or surgery
      • Division of Artificial Organs vs. artificial organs division
  • Be careful not to confuse department and division.
    • Example:
      • Department of Medicine vs. Division of Internal Medicine
East Health Campus Expand answer

Use the following address format for the East Health Campus in Hershey:

Penn State Health Breast Center
East Health Campus
30 Hope Dr.
Entrance A, Suite 1800
Hershey, PA 17033

Electrodiagnostic Expand answer

One word

Emergency Department Expand answer

Spell out, do not abbreviate to ED.

Endowed chairs Expand answer
  • Endowed chair names are capitalized.
    • Example: the William Pierce Endowed Chair
Esteem Penn State Health Cosmetic Associates Expand answer

Esteem Penn State Health Cosmetic Associates

Federal, state Expand answer
  • Lowercase
    • Example:
      • The program is awaiting state and federal funding.
Fellowship-trained Expand answer

Use a hyphen between the following:

  • Fellowship-trained surgeon
  • …she is fellowship-trained.
Footnotes Expand answer

When citing sources in content intended for professional (not consumer) audiences, use the American Medical Association (AMA) citation style.

First, second and third person point of view:

  • First person pronouns: I, we, ours
  • Second person pronouns: you, yours, his, hers, its, theirs
  • Use third person in most narrative articles, clinical information and operational information.
  • First- and second-person is acceptable for patient-focused materials.
  • Direct-mail pieces can use a combination of first, second and third person.
Health care Expand answer

Health care is two words, in accordance with AP Stylebook.

Held Expand answer

Avoid using the word “held,” as in “A meeting will be held,” which is passive tense. Instead, use “presented,” “took place,” “is scheduled for” or other active verbs.

Hyphenated words Expand answer
  • Use a hyphen between two or more words when they come before a noun that they modify and act as a single idea.
    • Example:
      •  Patient-friendly service
  • Do not use a hyphen if the first word is an adverb (ends in -ly).
    • Example:
      • Newly formed committee
  • There are many examples of and exceptions to hyphenated words, so check the AP Stylebook.
Leading words Expand answer

Avoid using leading words such as so, mostly, most times, in order to, often and oftentimes. They are not necessary.

Impact Expand answer

Use “impact” as a noun only, not a verb.

Correct:
Your actions have an impact on the organization.

Incorrect:
You impact the organization.

Lime Spring Outpatient Center Expand answer
  • Use “Penn State Health Lime Spring Outpatient Center” or “Lime Spring Outpatient Center” when referencing the building.
  • Use “Penn State Health Medical Group – Lime Spring” when referencing the practice. This medical group is part of the Lime Spring Outpatient Center.
LionCare Expand answer

LionCare, the student-run, nonprofit clinic staffed by student and physician volunteers from Penn State College of Medicine and Penn State Health Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, is one word.

LionReach trailer Expand answer

“LionReach” is one word with no spaces in between.

Orthopaedics vs. Orthopedics Expand answer
  • Spell “orthopaedics” with an “ae” when referring to the Department of Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation at the Milton S. Hershey Medical Center.
  • Spell it as “orthopedics” for all other uses.
Numbers Expand answer
  • Spell out all numbers zero to nine. Use numerals from 10 and up. This differs from University Style, which spells out numbers lower than 100 in nonscientific text. If a number higher than 100 is rounded off or approximated, spell it out in nonscientific copy. Otherwise, 100 and higher are numerals, in text.

Exceptions:

  • Dates: Sept. 15, 2018 (no “th” on 15)
  • Ages: 8 years old; he was an 8-year-old boy
  • 2% (consistent with AP Stylebook)
  • Temperatures: 9 degrees
  • Spell out first, second, third, etc. This rule applies to both print and online. This differs from University Style, which states that for online writing, numerals are frequently used in all instances.
  • Spell out numbers at the beginning of a sentence.
  • Do not use hyphens to replace words in numeric ranges when in sentence form.
    • Example: “From 5 to 7 p.m.” Not “From 5-7 p.m.”
Nursing Credentials Expand answer
  • Do not use credentials for nurses in most external-facing materials. This is consistent with Penn State style.
    • Example: Sharon Silver, a licensed practical nurse…
  • The only exceptions to this rule are internal memos, publications and tabular materials (lists), such as event programs, lists of award winners in an article and photo captions in grant award articles.
  • When nursing credentials are needed, list them in the following order:
    • Education – MSN
    • Licensure – RN or LPN
    • Specialty – APRN, OCN
    • Example: Margaret Miranda, MSN, RN, APRN, OCN
Over Expand answer
  • Use “more than” instead of word “over” when describing numbers.
    • Example: More than 2,000 people attended the conference.
  • “Over” should be used to describe a spatial reference.
    • Example: The Life Lion flew over the bridge.
Passive voice Expand answer
  • Avoid using passive voice, which makes writing sound weak.
    • Examples:
      • Passive: Action on the bill is being considered by the committee.
      • Active: The committee is considering action on the bill.
Patients Expand answer
  • Do not refer to people as “cancer patients” or “pediatric cancer patients.” Instead, use “people with cancer” or “children with cancer.” The same can be applied to other conditions, such as diabetes and autism.
  • Use patients’ first name on the second reference to them in an article.
Penn State PRO Wellness Expand answer

The word “PRO” in Penn State PRO Wellness is all caps.

Phone numbers Expand answer
  • Use hyphens to separate the area code from the exchange and the exchange from the number: 814-863-1870. No parentheses around area code.
  • For Penn State Health phone numbers, do not use a four-digit extension by itself. Insert the extension after 717-531-xxxx. For extensions that are more than four digits, use 717-531-0003, x320039.
  • Use “x” rather than” “ext.” for extensions.
  • When listing a phone number on a website, web authors should always make the phone number mobile friendly/clickable by creating a hyperlink. Highlight the phone number and use one of the following formats:
    • Examples:
      • tel: 7175311234 (Hershey, 4-digit extension)
      • tel: 7175310003,123456 (Hershey, 6-digit extension)
      • tel: 6103781234 (Reading)
      • tel: 8142351234 (State College)
      • tel: 7173911234,7890 (Community Medical Group)
Photo captions Expand answer
  • Include caption information for all photos. Captions should be written in active voice and identify the people in the photo from left to right.
    • Examples:
      • Marty Woodfin and the EMS crew pose near the Life Lion ambulance. From left are EMT Robert Snyder, Paramedic Jeff Gewertz, Woodfin, EMT Justin McNaughton and Paramedic Scott Sheriff.
      • Nurse Victoria Lutz, left, and Tabitha Eckert work with a patient in the Surgical and Anesthesia Intensive Care Unit at Penn State Health Milton S. Hershey Medical Center.
        (Note: because Lutz is identified as being on the left, Eckert does not need to be identified as being on the right.)
  • Avoid trite phrases such as “is shown,” “is pictured” and “looks on.”
  • Do not put parentheses around “right” or “left.”
Physician assistant Expand answer

The plural of “physician assistant” is “physician assistants,” not “physicians assistant.”

Point of view Expand answer
  • First person pronouns: I, we, ours
  • Second person pronouns: you, yours, his, hers, its, theirs
  • Use third person in most narrative articles, clinical information and operational information.
  • First- and second-person is acceptable for patient-focused materials.
  • Direct-mail pieces can use a combination of first, second and third person.
Postdoctoral Expand answer

One word

Provider Expand answer

A provider is anyone who provides direct patient clinical care, such as resident physicians and advanced practice providers.

Punctuation Expand answer

Ampersand

  • Ampersands are only used in logos, headlines and titles.
  • Spell out “and” in articles and other text. Do not use an ampersand.
  • Use an ampersand only for external organizations that have an ampersand in the official part of the company name.

Example: U.S. News & World Report

“And”

  • versus “&” – ampersands are used in logos only, not text.
  • versus “/” — Do not use “/”.
  • Use “and” or “or” instead of “and/or”.

Em dash

  • Insert a space on both sides of an em dash.

En dash

  • Use en dash for numeric ranges. Examples: 2009–2018. $75,000–$80,000.
  • In print, do not use an en dash to replace a hyphen.
  • On the web, use a hyphen instead of an en dash because en dashes do not convert digitally.

Exclamation points

  • Limit use of exclamation points unless they are part of a direct quote or other thought that requires true exclamatory emphasis which cannot be conveyed some other way.

Hyphens

  • Follow AP Stylebook.
  • Use a hyphen following the prefix co- when applied to occupation or status.
  • Use hyphens to connect compounds that are used as an adjective before a noun. Example: two-parent home.
  • Do not use hyphens to combine words that end in – ly with other words:
    • Examples:
      • Minimally invasive, NOT minimally-invasive
      • Recently deceased, NOT recently-deceased

Periods

  • Use a single space after periods.

Quotation marks

  • Punctuation goes inside quotation marks, even in the middle of a sentence.
    • Example:
      • “Lions, tigers and bears, oh my!” said Dorothy

Serial comma

  • Do not use a comma after the next-to-last item in a series. This differs from Penn State University Style and the Chicago Manual of Style.
    • Example:
      • In preparation for the event, the coordinator set up the tables, chairs and risers.
Recently Expand answer

Avoid using the word “recently.” Use a specific date or time period, such as “in November” or “several weeks ago.”

Seasons Expand answer
  • Lowercase season when used with year: spring 2018.
  • Lowercase season when used in sentence: The spring semester.
  • Seasons should only be capitalized at the beginning of a sentence.
State names Expand answer
  • State names are abbreviated when used in the body of an article in conjunction with a town. Example: Annapolis, Md. This differs from the AP Stylebook, which spells them out.
  • Traditional state abbreviations, such as “Pa.,” are used in articles.
  • Postal code abbreviations, such as “PA” are used in addresses.
  • See www.thoughtco.com/state-abbreviations-1691753 for a complete list of state abbreviations and postal codes.
  • The names of eight states are never abbreviated in articles: Alaska, Hawaii, Idaho, Iowa, Maine, Ohio, Texas and Utah.

See the AP Stylebook for a list of cities that can stand alone without states.

The Expand answer
  • Do not use “The” before names of Penn State Health entities, such as:
    • Examples:
      • Penn State Health Milton S. Hershey Medical Center
      • Hershey Medical Center
      • Penn State Children’s Hospital
      • Penn State Neuroscience Institute
      • Children’s Miracle Network
  • “The” can be used on subsequent references such as:
    • Examples:
      • the Milton S. Hershey Medical Center
      • the Medical Center
      • the Children’s Hospital
  • “The” may be used before a Penn State Health entity if the sentence would be awkward without it.
  • Capitalize “The” when used before “Commonwealth of Pennsylvania”:
    • Example:
      • The Commonwealth of Pennsylvania
  • Do not capitalize “the” as part of the name of an organization, newspaper, etc.
THON Expand answer
  • Formal reference: Penn State IFC/Panhellenic Dance Marathon
  • Second or familiar reference: Dance Marathon
  • Continuous mentions: THON (all caps)
Time of day Expand answer

For time ranges in lists and marketing materials, use an en dash with no space before or after it in lists:

  • 8 a.m.-2 p.m.

If both times are in the a.m. or p.m., use the following format:

  • 8-10 a.m.
  • 1-4 p.m.

To avoid confusion, use noon and midnight rather than 12 p.m. and 12 a.m.

  • Do not use minutes for times that are on the hour.
    • Example:
      • 6 p.m., not 6:00 p.m. This differs from University Style, which states that because time designations are not always on the hour, use :00 with times that are on the hour for consistency.
  • If times are part of a narrative rather than a list, use the words “from”and “to”:
    • Example:
      • “…from 7:30 to 8:30 a.m.” Do not use “…from 7:30-8:30 a.m.”
  • Use periods between a.m. and p.m.
  • If times are part of a bulleted list, use the following format:
    • Examples:
      • Wednesday, Nov. 22: 11 p.m.-1 a.m.
      • Thursday, Nov. 23: 11 a.m.-6:30 p.m.
Titles Expand answer
  • Use Dr. for clinical types only (MD and DO).
  • For PhD use title.

Example: John Smith, who holds a PhD in engineering.

  • Drop “Dr.” and use last name only on subsequent references.
  • Do not use credentials for nurses in most external-facing materials.
  • Do not use periods in credentials, including MD. This differs from Penn State University Style, which abbreviates some degrees with periods and without spaces.
  • Do not use periods in PhD. This differs from AP Stylebook but avoids inconsistency with other credentials.
  • Job titles: Capitalize when before name; lowercase when after name or when separated by commas.
  • Do not include employees’ middle initials.
Today Expand answer
  • “Today” can be used in news releases but should always be used in conjunction with a date to optimize content for web and search.

Example: The board voted today (June 4) to…

Training Expand answer
  • Say “training session” or “training program” rather than “training”.
    • Example:
      • A Stop the Bleed training session will be offered free of charge to the community.
Tree House Café Expand answer

Two words (not Treehouse Café).

University Park Curriculum/Regional Campus Expand answer
  • The Penn State College of Medicine University Park Curriculum refers to the academic medical program for medical students who want to learn in State College.
  • The University Park regional campus is where the University Park Curriculum is located. This reference also includes the five Penn State Health Medical Group practice sites in State College.
  • These two terms should not be used interchangeably.
Web addresses Expand answer
  • https:// is not required in most cases.
  • www is considered unnecessary.
  • Capitalization in a web address may vary for stylistic purposes and readability but will not affect search:
    • Examples:
      • hmc.pennstatehealth.org
      • thefutureofhealthcare.org
Website Expand answer

One word with a lowercase w.

Wide Expand answer

Do not use hyphens in the following words:

  • Universitywide
  • Systemwide
  • Companywide
YouTube video descriptions Expand answer

When writing a description of a video for YouTube:

  • Start with a compelling summary of the video.
  • Mention your top keywords in the first two to three sentences of your description for best results.
  • Offer value – why should someone watch this video?

Include a call to action.

Examples:
Meet 5-year-old Gannon. For the first five years of his life, he was unable to swallow safely and was fed through a gastrostomy tube. Now, he begins the journey of what so many take for granted: learning how to eat.

Penn State Cancer Institute is the first and only health care facility in central Pennsylvania to offer CAR-T therapy to adult patients with lymphoma who have exhausted all other treatment options. Tim Card, 41, of Mt. Joy, Lancaster County, was the first patient to undergo CAR-T therapy at Penn State Health. Here’s his story.

Web styles Expand answer

https://

  • Delete https:// from web addresses that do not require it. Some URLs require https://. Always check links before including them in copy.

email

  • Spell “email” without hyphens or initial capital letter unless it begins a sentence.

Internet

  • Use lowercase “i” in internet unless it begins a sentence.

URLs

  • In print, URLs should be broken after the slash or before the period when they do not fit on one line.
  • Do not use a hyphen to indicate a break in a URL.
  • Do not include a trailing slash in URLs.

www

  • Drop “www” from web addresses that do not require it. Some URLs require www. Always check links before including them in copy.

Website

  • The word website should appear as one word, all lowercase, unless it begins a sentence. When referring to the World Wide Web, use uppercase W (Web). This differs from the AP Stylebook, which uses a lowercase w.
  • Use the website name with a hyperlink rather than the URL whenever possible.

Example: See the College of Medicine website.

Boilerplates

Boilerplate descriptions of Penn State Health entities Expand answer

Penn State Health

Penn State Health is a multi-hospital health system serving patients and communities across 29 counties in central Pennsylvania. It employs more than 14,000 people systemwide.

The system includes Penn State Health Milton S. Hershey Medical Center,

Penn State Children’s Hospital, and Penn State Cancer Institute based in Hershey, Pa.;

Penn State Health St. Joseph Medical Center and more than 2,000 physicians and direct care providers at more than 100 medical office locations. Additionally, the system jointly operates various health care providers, including Penn State Health Rehabilitation Hospital, Hershey Outpatient Surgery Center, Hershey Endoscopy Center, Horizon Home Healthcare and Pennsylvania Psychiatric Institute.

In December 2017, Penn State Health partnered with Highmark Health to facilitate creation of a value-based, community care network in the region.

Penn State Health shares an integrated strategic plan and operations with Penn State College of Medicine, the University’s medical school. With operations in both State College and Hershey, Pa., the College of Medicine boasts a portfolio of nearly $100 million in funded research.

Milton S. Hershey Medical Center

Founded in 1963 through a gift from The Milton S. Hershey Foundation, Penn State Health Milton S. Hershey Medical Center is a leading academic medical center located in Hershey, Pa. The 564-bed Milton S. Hershey Medical Center is a provider of high-level, patient-focused medical care. Annually the Medical Center admits 29,000 patients, accepts over 1 million outpatient visits, receives 73,000 emergency room patients and performs 33,000 surgical procedures. As a Magnet-designated hospital since 2007, Hershey Medical Center employs caregivers who are dedicated to excellence and achieving superior patient and community outcomes. The Hershey Medical Center campus includes Penn State College of Medicine (Penn State’s medical school), Penn State Cancer Institute and Penn State Children’s Hospital—the region’s only children’s hospital.

Penn State College of Medicine (long version)

Enrolling its first students in 1967, Penn State College of Medicine confers the doctor of medicine degree, as well as many graduate degrees in conjunction with the University’s Graduate School. The college offers doctor of philosophy degrees in anatomy, biomedical sciences, biostatistics, epidemiology and neuroscience; an MD/PhD Medical Scientist Training Program; a physician assistant master’s degree program; and master’s degrees in anatomy, clinical research, laboratory animal medicine and public health. The college is also part of several cross-college degree initiatives, including the master of professional studies in homeland security; an accelerated master of public health; and a doctorate in clinical and translational sciences. In total, the College of Medicine has more than 1,700 students and trainees in medicine, nursing, other health professions and biomedical research at two locations, at Penn State Health Milton S. Hershey Medical Center in Hershey, Pa., and a regional medical campus in State College, Pa.

The College of Medicine boasts a portfolio of nearly $100 million in funded research annually. Projects range from development of artificial organs and advanced diagnostics to groundbreaking cancer treatments and understanding the fundamental causes of disease.

Short version:

Located on the campus of Penn State Health Milton S. Hershey Medical Center in Hershey, Pa., Penn State College of Medicine boasts a portfolio of nearly $100 million in funded research. Projects range from development of artificial organs and advanced diagnostics to groundbreaking cancer treatments and understanding the fundamental causes of disease. Enrolling its first students in 1967, the College of Medicine has more than 1,700 students and trainees in medicine, nursing, other health professions and biomedical research in both Hershey and State College, Pa.

Penn State Children’s Hospital

Penn State Children’s Hospital is the only children’s hospital between Pittsburgh and Philadelphia fully equipped to treat the most severely ill children of central Pennsylvania, with both the highest-level neonatal intensive care unit and a Level I pediatric trauma center. Children’s Hospital physicians and nurses provide comprehensive support and specialized care to infants, children, and adolescents every day. Located on the campus of Penn State Health Milton S. Hershey Medical Center in Hershey, Pa., the Children’s Hospital focuses on providing first-rate health care to all children, from those with complex heart disease to childhood cancers, allowing patients to receive the full spectrum of highest-quality care close to their homes.

Penn State Cancer Institute

On the campus of Penn State Health Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, Penn State Cancer Institute is committed to fighting cancer on every front: through education and prevention, early detection and diagnosis, effective treatment, and survivorship programs. Clinical services are offered in three locations in central Pennsylvania – State College (through a partnership with Mount Nittany Health), Hershey and Reading (at Penn State Health St. Joseph). The Cancer Institute has three research programs focused on the themes of Cancer Control, Mechanisms of Carcinogenesis and Experimental Therapeutics. Additionally, pediatric cancer research led by faculty at Penn State Children’s Hospital and Penn State College of Medicine is a very visible part of Penn State Cancer Institute and greatly benefits from THON and Four Diamonds.

Penn State Heart and Vascular Institute

Penn State Heart and Vascular Institute is located on the campus of Penn State Health Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, a leading university health center located in Hershey, Pa. With a team of more than 50 physicians and surgeons, the Heart and Vascular Institute treats common to complex heart and vascular conditions and has received Joint Commission accreditation for its heart failure program and for the program to implant left ventricular assist devices as destination therapy in patients with end-stage heart failure. Building on a history of pioneering research in the area of heart pumps and artificial heart development, faculty and staff work to develop new medical and surgical interventions designed to save lives.

Marketing Style

Marketing Style Expand answer

Branding

  • The “This is Penn State Health” brand campaign uses the following tagline:
    This…is the health we need to live the way we want.
  • That wording should never be changed. “You” and “they” should not be substituted for “we” because “we” refers to both the community and Penn State Health.

Central PA vs. central Pennsylvania

In ad copy it is acceptable to use “Central PA.” In narrative copy use “central Pennsylvania.”

Hero Image Specifications

  • Do not put text on the image. The only exception is U.S. News & World Report badges.
  • Limit word count on text bar to six words whenever possible.
  • Delete articles such as “a” and “the” to save words.
  • Keep text to one line, not two.
  • Make text lowercase unless it includes a proper name.
  • Do not use periods at the end of text.
  • Limit the number of hero images running at one time to five.

Location and Room Number

Add a comma after building and before room number.

Example:
Academic Support Building, Room 1101

Logos

In ad copy, no need to include the entity name if the ad includes the entity logo.

Leading-Edge vs.Cutting-Edge

Use the term “leading-edge” instead of “cutting-edge.”

Locations

See Appendix B for correct wording of Penn State Health Medical Group outpatient locations.

Phone Numbers and Email Addresses

Always check that the phone number and email address are correct on marketing materials. If needed, call the phone number to verify.

Precision Medicine vs. Personalized Medicine

Use the term “precision medicine” instead of “personalized medicine.”

Salutation in Letters

Make “friend” or “colleagues” lowercase in the salutation of a letter.

Appendix A

Alternative text Expand answer
  • Do not include colors in alt text. Alt text descriptions are for people with sight differences, so colors are not useful and can be frustrating.
  • Describe what is happening in the photo – who, where, when.
    • Example:
      • “Dr. Jessyka Lightall receives a hug from a young female patient in Peru in 2017. The young girl has lumps on her forehead and nose and an IV port in her hand, covered by tape, and her eyes are closed. Dr. Lightall is smiling. A hospital bed is in the background.
      • Do not identify a person by race in alt text unless the person’s race is relevant to the photo. A diversity photo might say, “A group of students of different ethnicities gathers…”)
  • Headshots should be written in the following format:
    • Example:
      • “Dr. Genevieve Andrews of Penn State Health Milton S. Hershey Medical Center/Penn State College of Medicine is pictured in a head-and-shoulders
        professional photo, wearing a medical coat with the medical center’s logo
        on it.” Optional: “She is wearing glasses” or “She is smiling.”

Appendix B

Penn State Health Medical Group Community Practice Division Locations Expand answer

Berks County

  • Penn State Health Medical Group – All About Children
  • Penn State Health Medical Group – Berks Cardiology
  • Penn State Health Medical Group – Downtown Family Practice
  • Penn State Health Medical Group – Downtown Pediatrics
  • Penn State Health Medical Group – Downtown Specialty Services
  • Penn State Health Medical Group – Exeter Ridge
  • Penn State Health Medical Group – Fleetwood
  • Penn State Health Medical Group – Muhlenberg
  • Penn State Health Medical Group – Oley
  • Penn State Health Medical Group – Robesonia
  • Penn State Health Medical Group – Schuylkill Valley
  • Penn State Health Medical Group – Spring Ridge
  • Penn State Health Medical Group – Strausstown
  • Penn State Health St. Joseph – Boyertown
  • Penn State Health St. Joseph — Exeter Ridge
  • Penn State Health St. Joseph – Leesport
  • Penn State Health St. Joseph -Maidencreek
  • Penn State Health St. Joseph – Robesonia
  • Penn State Health St. Joseph – Schuylkill Valley
  • Penn State Health St. Joseph – Spring Ridge

Centre County

  • Penn State Health Medical Group – Benner Pike
  • Penn State Health Medical Group – Colonnade
  • Penn State Health Medical Group – Park Avenue
  • Penn State Health Medical Group – Windmere Centre

Cumberland County

  • Penn State Health Medical Group – Andrews Patel Hematology/Oncology
  • Penn State Health Medical Group – Camp Hill
  • Penn State Health Medical Group – Lemoyne
  • Penn State Health Medical Group – Mechanicsburg
  • Penn State Health Medical Group – Wilson Street

Dauphin County

  • Penn State Health Medical Group – Andrews Patel Hematology/Oncology
  • Penn State Health Medical Group – Briarcrest
  • Penn State Health Cocoa Outpatient Center
  • Penn State Health Medical Group – Cocoa
  • Penn State Health Medical Group – Fishburn Road
  • Penn State Health Medical Group – Harrisburg
  • Penn State Health Medical Group – Middletown
  • Penn State Health Medical Group – Nyes Road

Lancaster County

  • Penn State Health Medical Group – Cornerstone
  • Penn State Health Medical Group – Eastbrook
  • Penn State Health Medical Group – Elizabethtown
  • Penn State Health Medical Group – Kissel Hill
  • Penn State Health Lime Spring Outpatient Center
  • Penn State Health Medical Group – Lime Spring
  • Penn State Health Medical Group – Manor
  • Penn State Health Medical Group – Mount Joy
  • Penn State Health Medical Group – Prospect
  • Penn State Health Medical Group – South Lancaster

Lebanon County

  • Penn State Health Medical Group – Palmyra

Luzerne County

  • Penn State Health Medical Group – Kingston

Schuylkill County

Penn State Health Medical Group – Berks Cardiology

York County

  • Penn State Health Medical Group – White Rose
  • Penn State Health Medical Group – York
Penn State Health Medical Group Academic Practice Division Locations Expand answer
  • Penn State Health Medical Group – Benner Pike
  • Penn State Health Medical Group – Briarcrest
  • Penn State Health Medical Group – Camp Hill
  • Penn State Health Medical Group – Colonnade
  • Penn State Health Medical Group – Elizabethtown
  • Penn State Health Medical Group – Fishburn Road
  • Penn State Health Medical Group – Harrisburg
  • Penn State Health Medical Group – Lemoyne
  • Penn State Health Medical Group – Mechanicsburg
  • Penn State Health Medical Group – Middletown
  • Penn State Health Medical Group – Mount Joy
  • Penn State Health Medical Group – Nyes Road
  • Penn State Health Medical Group – Palmyra
  • Penn State Health Medical Group – Park Avenue
  • Penn State Health Medical Group – Wilson Street