Educator Resources

The Woodward Center provides a variety of resources to educators, many of which will be shared here as available.

Jump to topic

Search

Faculty Scripts to Help Avoid Mistreatment

What Should - and Shouldn't - Educators Say? Expand answer

The Office for a Respectful Learning Environment has provided a list of specific strategies and things to say – and not to say – to help faculty ensure a good experience by students and simultaneously avoid perceptions of mistreatment.

These suggested scripts were not written to offend faculty who are talented teachers, but rather to offer tools to help faculty navigate the complex area of student mistreatment where even well-intentioned efforts are sometimes misinterpreted.

See the suggested scripts and strategies

Tip Sheet: Writing Better Objectives

Overview Expand answer

Writing course objectives is a key task for educators. The Woodward Center for Excellence in Health Sciences Education offers the following tips for writing better objectives.

Examining Objectives Expand answer

Comment on the objectives listed here. Why are they strong or weak? How would you revise them? Use Bloom’s Taxonomy to help you revise.

  • Describe the location of the heart in the thorax and mediastinum.
  • Relate thorax surface anatomy to underlying cardiovascular structures.
  • Describe the anatomy of the heart, including its coverings, chambers, and walls.
  • Identify the valves of the heart. Explain their function, and consequences of valve incompetence.
  • Apply your knowledge of anatomy to understanding clinical conditions related to the heart.
How to Write a Learning Objective Expand answer

From University of Connecticut Office of Institutional Research and Effectiveness:

  • Specify both an observable behavior and the object of that behavior.
    • Ex. Students will be able to write a research paper.
  • The criterion should be specified.
    • Ex. Students will be able to write a research paper in the appropriate scientific style.
  • The condition under which the behavior occurs should be specified.
    • Ex. At the end of their field research, students will be able to write a research paper in the appropriate scientific style.
  • Note that the verb you choose will help you focus on what you assess.
Checklist for Objectives/Outcomes Expand answer

From University of Connecticut Office of Institutional Research and Effectiveness:

  • Are the outcomes aligned with the mission, vision, values and goals?
  • Do the outcomes clearly describe and define the expected abilities, knowledge, values and attitudes of graduates of the program?
  • Are the outcomes simply stated?
  • Is it possible to collect accurate and reliable data for each outcome?
  • Are they stated so that it is possible to use a single method to measure the outcome? Are they stated so that outcomes requiring different assessment methods are not bundled into one statement?
  • Are they written using action verbs to specify definite, observable behaviors?
  • Does the language describe student rather than teacher behaviors?
  • Does the language describe a learning outcome, not a process?